Managed Kubernetes options

In this section, we provide more specific installation instructions for some managed Kubernetes providers, such as Azure AKS, Amazon EKS, Digital Ocean and Google Cloud Platform.

Note

These guides are provided as example scenarios only. Other managed Kubernetes providers or preconfigured Kubernetes distributions may also work with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes.

These are third-party tools and Crate.io is not responsible for those tools. That said, we have tested the instructions provided below for functionality. Users less familiar with customizing their Kubernetes stack on their own may find any of these approaches a practical solution for easier CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes setup.

Table of contents

Azure AKS

Below is a step-by-step guide to using Azure AKS as a managed Kubernetes provider in combination with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes. The steps are merely examples of a process validated by us; other methods may work also. We provide this information for ease of use and to illustrate how to work with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes.

Sign up

First you must sign up with Azure AKS. On the AKS page, click the Start Free button or use the pay-as-you-go option. If you have an Azure account already, you can use this account to sign up with. Once signed up, continue to the Azure portal.

Create kubernetes cluster

In the Azure portal, find the “Kubernetes services” option. (You can use the search bar at the top to do so.) You will see an overview of any Kubernetes services you may already have running. Click on Create, then Create Kubernetes cluster.

In the configuration menu, choose the desired subscription and resource group or create a new one. Name your cluster as you wish and select the desired region. We recommend using the default Kubernetes version. Finally, pick the server availability you want, which affects your AKS pricing.

For the node size, it is important to conform to the minimum requirements set out above. For this reason, we strongly recommend choosing a VM size that is at least 4 CPUs and 8GiB of RAM, for example the “D4s_v3” combination. Additionally, we recommend using at least 3 nodes for a production-grade high-availability setup. Other settings may be left on default or adjusted as desired depending on your production requirements. (The default settings should be fully functional for CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes.) Then proceed with creating the cluster. This process may take some time.

If you have kubectl installed, you can check on the node status once it is finished by running in the Azure CLI the command

az aks get-credentials --resource-group <resource group name> --name <cluster name>

followed by

kubectl get nodes

which will show you all nodes. When all nodes are set to ‘Ready’, the cluster is functioning properly. (Make sure you are in the right subscription before running the commands, or this process will not work.)

After cluster deployment, you can click on Go to resource in the Azure Portal to check that all configurations are as intended.

Set up Edge region

Sign up with, or log into, the CrateDB Cloud Console. Go to the Regions tab in the Subscription overview and create a custom Edge region by clicking on Create Edge region. When the region has appeared in the regions list, it will show a script that you can copy into your CLI. Do so and confirm installation of CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes on the correct cluster. The script will prompt you for installation of the prerequisite tools as needed. To configure the necessary storage classes, follow the instructions given in the script and then rerun the script command.

The script, once run, will validate the installation of the CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes stack. You can also check that everything is operational by going to your Kubernetes service in the Azure portal and checking the tab Workloads, under Kubernetes Resources.

Deploy Edge cluster

Finally, return to the CrateDB Cloud Console and click on Deploy cluster in the custom region you have created. Follow the steps described above to configure your CrateDB Cloud cluster. At the end of the process, you should have a working CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes install on Azure AKS managed Kubernetes.

Amazon EKS

Below is a step-by-step guide to using Amazon EKS as a managed Kubernetes provider in combination with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes. The steps are merely examples of a process validated by us; other methods may work also. We provide this information for ease of use and to illustrate how to work with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes.

Note

Amazon EKS cluster configuration has some complexity relating to the structure of AWS security management. The steps below try to provide a step-by-step guide, but may become outdated as AWS changes its interfaces or functionality. Since Crate.io is not responsible for EKS, we cannot guarantee this documentation remains fully in line with the latest AWS user flow. You can find current details on the EKS cluster creation docs.

Sign up

First you must create an AWS account and log in with it. If you have an AWS account already, proceed directly to the AWS Management Console. Find the Elastic Kubernetes Service (you can search with the search bar at the top).

Create Kubernetes cluster

At the EKS portal, click the Add cluster button and hit Create to create a new cluster. Having done that, you will arrive at the Kubernetes cluster configuration. Give it a name and use the latest version of Kubernetes, as long as it is < 1.22. Set the service role according to your requirements. (Note: you can set the region at the top right, next to the user settings.)

Networking settings can be left to default or adjusted as desired. The same applies to logging. Finish with Create. The EKS cluster will now be created.

Configuration

Once the cluster is set to active in the EKS cluster configuration panel, it will be ready to be configured (you may still see a banner at the top stating it is being created).

Make sure to add the necessary IAM role policies if you created a cluster with Kubernetes 1.20 or earlier, or a cluster of 1.21 or later that uses the IPv4 family (this corresponds to the default settings.) Under Configuration, go to Cluster IAM Role ARN and click the link below it. This will lead to the IAM Management Console. In this console, click Add permissions, then Add policies. Search for “Amazon_EKS_CNI_Policy”. Tick the box and then click Attach policies.

Under cluster Configuration, now go to Add node group. Configure the node group by adding a name, assigning it a suitable node IAM role (you can create one in the IAM Management Console if necessary). Click Next. In the compute and scaling configuration, assure that the minimum requirements set out above are met. We recommend choosing at least 4 CPUs and at least 8GiB of RAM, for example the “t3.xlarge” instance type. Your disk size should be adequate to your needs - we recommend at least 8 GiB per node. For production-grade clusters, always assure a minimum of 3 nodes. For the network configuration, adjust to your preferences or leave it to the default settings. Hit Create to create the node group.

In the AWS CLI, enter the following command (make sure you are logged in properly):

aws eks update-kubeconfig --region <region code> --name <cluster name>

You can check everything is working correctly with kubectl:

kubectl get nodes

Set up Edge region

Sign up with, or log into, the CrateDB Cloud Console. Go to the Regions tab in the Subscription overview and create a custom Edge region by clicking on Create Edge region. When the region has appeared in the regions list, it will show a script that you can copy into your CLI. Do so and confirm installation of CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes on the correct cluster. The script will prompt you for installation of the prerequisite tools as needed. To configure the necessary storage classes, follow the instructions given in the script and then rerun the script command.

Note that for EKS the default storage class is not called default but will have a different name, e.g. gp2 or gp3. You have to adjust the script accordingly. For more info, refer to the documentation on AWS storage classes. You can find the relevant storage class name with kubectl:

kubectl get sc

The script, once run, will validate the installation of the CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes stack. You can check everything is running correctly in the EKS cluster interface.

Deploy Edge cluster

Finally, return to the CrateDB Cloud Console and click on Deploy cluster in the custom region you have created. Follow the steps described above to configure your CrateDB Cloud cluster. At the end of the process, you should have a working CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes install on AWS EKS managed Kubernetes.

Digital Ocean

Below is a step-by-step guide to using Digital Ocean as a managed Kubernetes provider in combination with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes. The steps are merely examples of a process validated by us; other methods may work also. We provide this information for ease of use and to illustrate how to work with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes.

Sign up

First you must sign up with Digital Ocean. On the Kubernetes page, click Sign up and make an account. Verify your email address to proceed. (Digital Ocean may also require a token pre-payment.)

Create Kubernetes cluster

Create a Kubernetes cluster using the Digital Ocean cloud interface, under Manage, then Kubernetes. When configuring the cluster, make sure to choose an option with sufficient hardware capacity. For example, when choosing the Basic machine type, use the Max plan for that type to ensure sufficient power. Then proceed to deploy the cluster.

Configuration

While the Kubernetes cluster is installing, use the link provided to locally download the configuration YAML file and note the local address of the file. Install kubectl if you have not done so already. Then point the Kubeconfig configuration path to where you stored the YAML file:

export KUBECONFIG=~<file source>

Subsequently, wait for the install to finish and check that the nodes are running as intended:

kubectl get nodes

Set up Edge region

Now, go to the CrateDB Cloud Console and create a custom CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes region. Follow the steps outlined from the CrateDB sign up onwards to proceed. Run the script the CrateDB Cloud Console shows in the panel for the custom region you just created and install prerequisites as necessary.

Define storage class

Eventually, the script will indicate that there is no crate-premium storage class available. To define this storage class correctly, copy the default storage class Digital Ocean provides, then change the the name to crate-premium in the copied file. For example, using kubectl and Vim:

kubectl get sc do-block-storage -o yaml | grep -vi is-default-class | sed -e 's/name: do-block-storage/name: crate-premium/' | kubectl create -f -

Then re-run the script until it is successful.

Deploy Edge cluster

Finally, return to the CrateDB Cloud Console and click on Deploy cluster in the custom region when it is available. Follow the steps described above to proceed. At the end of the process, you should have a working CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes install on Digital Ocean managed Kubernetes.

Google Cloud Platform

Below is a full walkthrough of how to get CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes up and running on Google Cloud. The steps are merely examples of a process validated by us; other methods may work also. We provide this information for ease of use and to illustrate how to work with CrateDB Cloud on Kubernetes. In this example, we use Google Cloud’s Kubernetes Engine with a standard setup.

Sign up

Signing up for Google Cloud is very straightforward. You can use your existing Google account, and after you set up the Cloud billing you are eligible for 90-day, $300 trial period. For details, see Google Cloud Free Program documentation.

Create Kubernetes cluster

The first step is to create a new Kubernetes cluster in the Google Cloud console. We recommend using a GKE Standard cluster. When configuring the nodes, it is important to remember that CrateDB Cloud Cluster needs at least 3 CPU cores and at least 5 GiB of memory per node. For better performance, it is also recommended to use compute-optimized nodes.

Google Cloud console cluster config

Configuration

Once your cluster is running, some configuration is needed. You will need to install the gcloud CLI and kubectl to configure the cluster.

To connect to your cluster from your console, use the command that appears after clicking the CONNECT button in the Google Cloud console. It will look similar to this:

gcloud container clusters get-credentials cluster-1 --zone us-central1-c --project key-decorator-356217

After successfully connecting, a message similar to this should be displayed:

kubeconfig entry generated for cluster-1.

Now that you are connected, you can configure the cluster using kubectl.

One thing that the CrateDB Cloud Edge deployment script can’t currently do is create a storage class for Kubernetes, you need to create them yourself. A good way is to start by displaying existing storage classes:

kubectl get sc

There should be one called standard (default). You can edit the storage class by redirecting its yaml code to a new file. Do that with this command:

kubectl get sc standard -o yaml > sc.yaml

This will write create a new .yaml file called sc.yaml. Initially, it should look something like this:

allowVolumeExpansion: true
apiVersion: storage.k8s.io/v1
kind: StorageClass
metadata:
  annotations:
    storageclass.kubernetes.io/is-default-class: "true"
  creationTimestamp: "2022-07-21T03:26:32Z"
  labels:
    addonmanager.kubernetes.io/mode: EnsureExists
  name: standard
  resourceVersion: "897"
  uid: 5d6bc49a-c46b-4222-bf36-0b7dfbd872d2
parameters:
  type: pd-standard
provisioner: kubernetes.io/gce-pd
reclaimPolicy: Delete
volumeBindingMode: Immediate

From this default storage class, you need to create two new classes: crate-standard and crate-premium

The yaml file for those should look like this:

allowVolumeExpansion: true
apiVersion: storage.k8s.io/v1
kind: StorageClass
metadata:
  name: crate-standard
parameters:
  type: pd-standard
provisioner: kubernetes.io/gce-pd
reclaimPolicy: Delete
volumeBindingMode: Immediate

Once you edit the sc.yaml file, save it and apply it with this command:

kubectl create -f sc.yaml

This will create the new crate-standard storage class. Repeat the steps for the crate-premium class:

allowVolumeExpansion: true
apiVersion: storage.k8s.io/v1
kind: StorageClass
metadata:
  name: crate-premium
parameters:
  type: pd-standard
provisioner: kubernetes.io/gce-pd
reclaimPolicy: Delete
volumeBindingMode: Immediate
kubectl create -f sc.yaml

The only difference between them is the name parameter. After issuing kubectl get sc you should now be able to see the new classes:

NAME                 PROVISIONER             RECLAIMPOLICY   VOLUMEBINDINGMODE      ALLOWVOLUMEEXPANSION   AGE
crate-premium        kubernetes.io/gce-pd    Delete          Immediate              true                   44s
crate-standard       kubernetes.io/gce-pd    Delete          Immediate              true                   7s

For a basic installation, this is all that is needed in terms of configuration.

Deploy a cluster

All that remains now is to use the command that is generated after creating an edge region in the CrateDB Cloud console. E.g.:

bash <(wget -qO- https://console.cratedb-dev.cloud/edge/cratedb-cloud-edge.sh) gAAAAABi2O81bYA8_qWQUU8svABjDdh0qNo1ZainUxDwx6MocxKJjBZ0X7Gw15QRj4LNIXZgoe7pig1fCJc_YC7UTnGacyi6Jn1-geiMBm1AGUOzXAjUIVUeCUV7jQCEtZjo4bWXaQzg7cr0bzkiLARK029M9PVTbtZbUJtO1HsFqUgnyP1-7exnylPkJ67NVwqD-ixKNdr_Ie6o5SxYlmhhjIge9fnAvQhtcURy-z4H0jBXhA7vURIL2CFXX4yWd30E-Wd1tnvP

Now you can deploy the cluster.